Water tanks are filled by the water from the bore hole.


Jennie with the older girls

Molo, Kenya

In June 2005 Pastor Paul Kingori and his wife Eunice, established what was then called the Arise and Shine orphanage home at Molo, Kenya (later registered as “The King’s House”) to help orphans and vulnerable children at risk. At that time they had 21 children (19 girls and 2 boys) between the ages of 6 and 17 years, choosing to have more girls than boys because, in Kenya, girls are often more vulnerable.

In 2009 Jennie and Don Waterman spent some time with Pastor Paul while on a course in Norwich, England where Paul shared with them about his orphanage project and also the “Voice of Gospel” Church, a growing church in the local community reaching out to many very impoverished people.

While still in Norwich, in early 2010, we introduced Paul to an English contact, Sheila Harris and, as a result of that meeting Sheila decided to support Paul’s work. With her dynamic encouragement and help, 3 women’s Empowerment Groups were started and she is continuing to raise funds to support Paul’s work with the orphanage.


In February 2011 Paul attended a weekend seminar entitled, “How to set-up and run a Community Empowerment Program” which was hosted and run by Nancy and New Dawn Association (NDA), in Kisumu, Kenya. The same team was subsequently invited to teach the same Community Empowerment seminar at Paul’s pastoral school in Kericho, Kenya.


As NDA’s main financial focus was committed to supporting the on-going running costs and development of the Kogony, Kisumu “Arise and Shine” orphanage project, we made it clear to Pastor Paul that, at that time, we would only be able to help his very worthy Molo project with very small financial assistance but we would maintain a close link with this work and hope it might be possible to assist Molo in different ways in the future.

January 2012 visit and update-

Jennie revisited the orphanage-home project in Molo and was able to encourage and assist the work there in several small ways. In spite of great challenges, Paul and his wife were continuing to provide a home and an education for 21 needy children.


January 2014 visit and update- It was wonderful to see Paul's orphanage re-sited on the hills overlooking Molo. This building project had taken 3 years. The day we visited Paul and Eunice was a very special day because we were able to witness the drilling of a water borehole by a UK charity firm. As the bore hole was being dug and hit the water level, we had the joy of seeing a fountain of fresh water gush forth. They now had supply of fresh water for the orphanage and crops, and also for the local community.


Also, while we were there, we witnessed the arrival of three new children proudly wearing their first school uniforms.  Although NDA’s main financial focus was still committed to supporting the on-going running costs and development of the Kogony, Kisumu “Arise and Shine” orphanage project, we were able to inject some small financial assistance into this worthy project.

February 2015 visit and up-date - We travelled to Molo, from Kisumu, to visit Pastor Paul’s and Eunice’s Orphanage project, now providing a home for girls, officially called “The King’s House”. On this visit NDA settled the orphanage’s considerable outstanding grocery bill at the local shop. Some extra treats were bought with specially donated monies and we had a delightful time visiting all the children and discovering the dramatic difference that the new water bore hole was having within the project and local community.

Pastor Paul and his wife, Eunice, are working very hard to make their project self-financing. Already they have milk from their goats, some eggs and chicken meat, and they are growing a wide variety of crops including maize and peas, even starting to grow strawberries.

The two goats kidded in February and March respectively so they no longer need to buy milk for their children, using the milk from the goats for their tea and afternoon porridge. Goat’s milk is highly nutritious and they are hopeful that the goats will have more kids in the near future.


However, the egg production had fallen below an economical level and they had to cull all the birds. They were seeking money to start again and re-stock with better breeds, and improve the building where the hens would be housed.


At our next NDA Board meeting, on our return home, New Dawn decided to send funds to finance a new empowerment program, whereby Paul could attend a poultry training course in Nairobi. Also funds were supplied to upgrade the facilities for the accommodation of the chicks, and to buy and rear 150 young chicks, together with their feeding program, in order to start an egg-laying project. Once the hens are laying, this will bring in extra funds to support the children.

On 9th October 2015 amidst much excitement, 158 three-week-old chicks arrived at the orphanage. In order to get a better and more reliable quality of chicks they were imported from India. They are a breed called Kuroiler, a cross between the White Leghorn / Rhode Island and the broiler, and are therefore a much more suitable hen for both egg and meat production.